Message from His Holiness the Dalai Lama

MESSAGE: My greetings to everyone attending the Meeting of Tibetans of Mixed Parentage being held in London 21-22 June 2014. My basic belief is that as human beings we are all the same; physically, mentally and emotionally. Differences in terms of race, colour, religion or ethnicity are of secondary importance. As Tibetans got to know people from other parts of the world, it was inevitable that there would be inter-marriages. Prior to 1959, it was not uncommon for Tibetans to marry people from neighbouring states like Nepal, Bhutan and Sikkim. After 1959, some of the Tibetans who had fled their homeland married people from various parts of the world. Today, their children have grown up and many of them play an active role in Tibetan affairs. At the present time one of our principal concerns is the preservation of the Tibetan language and culture, a culture focused on peace and non-violance. I would like to take this opportunity to encourage those of you who have a Tibetan father or mother, and an affinity for your Tibetan heritage, to strive for a deeper understanding of our Tibetan Buddhist culture so that not only you will benefit from it but also explore how you can help your Tibetan brothers and sisters to meet this challenge. With my prayers and good wishes, June 7, 2014
MESSAGE:
My greetings to everyone attending the Meeting of Tibetans of Mixed Parentage being held in London 21-22 June 2014.
My basic belief is that as human beings we are all the same; physically, mentally and emotionally. Differences in terms of race, colour, religion or ethnicity are of secondary importance. As Tibetans got to know people from other parts of the world, it was inevitable that there would be inter-marriages. Prior to 1959, it was not uncommon for Tibetans to marry people from neighbouring states like Nepal, Bhutan and Sikkim. After 1959, some of the Tibetans who had fled their homeland married people from various parts of the world. Today, their children have grown up and many of them play an active role in Tibetan affairs.
At the present time one of our principal concerns is the preservation of the Tibetan language and culture, a culture focused on peace and non-violance. I would like to take this opportunity to encourage those of you who have a Tibetan father or mother, and an affinity for your Tibetan heritage, to strive for a deeper understanding of our Tibetan Buddhist culture so that not only you will benefit from it but also explore how you can help your Tibetan brothers and sisters to meet this challenge.
With my prayers and good wishes,
June 7, 2014